This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
 

Monthly Archives: September 2016

How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar and Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a massive health problem worldwide.

About 29 million people, or 9% of all US adults, had type 2 diabetes in the year 2012.

Interestingly, long-term studies have linked coffee drinking with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

Yet, oddly enough, many short-term studies have shown that coffee and caffeine can raise blood sugar and insulin levels.

Why this happens is not fully known, but there are several theories.

This article examines the short-term and long-term effects of coffee on blood sugar and diabetes.

Coffee and Caffeine May Raise Blood Sugar

A major paradox exists between the long-term and short-term effects of coffee.

Short-term studies have linked caffeine and coffee consumption with increased blood sugar levels and insulin resistance.

A recent study showed that a single serving of coffee, containing 100 mg of caffeine, can negatively affect blood sugar control in healthy but overweight men.

Other short-term studies — both in healthy individuals and in type 2 diabetics — show that consuming caffeinated coffee impaired blood sugar regulation and insulin sensitivity after meals.

This does not happen with decaf coffee, which suggests that caffeine may be the agent that causes the spike in blood sugar. In fact, most of the studies on caffeine and blood sugar look at caffeine directly, not coffee.

Some studies have tried to address this issue, showing that the effects of caffeine and regular coffee are not the same.

Coffee Drinkers Have a Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

The health benefits of drinking coffee are well-documented.

In observational studies, coffee is linked to reduced blood sugar and insulin levels, which are major risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

Furthermore, consuming regular or decaf coffee on a regular basis is linked to a 23–50% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Studies have also shown that each daily cup of coffee you consume may reduce this risk by 4–8%.

Additionally, people who drink 4–6 cups of coffee each day have a lower risk of type 2 diabetes than people who drink less than 2 cups each day

Can Coffee Increase Your Metabolism and Help You Burn Fat

Coffee contains caffeine… which is the most commonly consumed psychoactive substance in the world.

Caffeine has made its way to most commercial fat burning supplements, for good reason.

It is one of the few substances that is known to help mobilize fats from the fat tissues and increase metabolism.

Coffee Can Help to Mobilize Fat From The Fat Tissues

Caffeine stimulates the nervous system, which sends direct signals to the fat cells to tell them to break down fat.

Another thing that caffeine does is to increase our blood levels of the hormone Epinephrine, which is also known as Adrenaline.

Epinephrine travels through the blood, to the fat tissues and send signals to break down fats and release them into the blood.

This is how caffeine helps to mobilize fat from the fat tissues, making it available for use as free fatty acids in the blood.

Coffee Can Increase The Metabolic Rate

How many calories we burn at rest is called the Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR).

The higher our metabolic rate, the easier it is for us to lose weight and the more we can allow ourselves to eat without gaining.

Studies show that caffeine can increase the metabolic rate by 3-11%, with larger doses having an even bigger effect.

Interestingly, most of the increase in metabolism is caused by an increase in the burning of fat.

Unfortunately, the effect is less pronounced in those who are obese.

In one study, the increase in fat burning in lean people is as high as 29%, while in obese individuals the increase is about 10%. The effect also appears to diminish with age and is more pronounced in younger individuals.

Caffeine can improve athletic performance via several mechanisms, one of those being increased mobilization of fatty acids from the fat tissues. Studies show that caffeine can improve exercise performance by 11-12%, on average.

Coffee | Good Or Bad For Brain

Coffee is a widely popular drink.

It has been unfairly demonized in the past, but is actually very healthy.

In fact, coffee is a major source of antioxidants in the Western diet.

It’s also associated with many health benefits, including a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes and liver disease.

But does coffee also have benefits for your brain? Let’s find out.

Active Ingredients in Coffee

Coffee is an incredibly healthy beverage. It contains hundreds of bioactive compounds that contribute to its powerful health benefits.

Many of these compounds are antioxidants, which fight the damage caused by free radicals in your cells.

Here are coffee’s most important active ingredients :

  • Caffeine: The main active ingredient in coffee, caffeine stimulates the central nervous system. It is the most commonly consumed psychoactive substance worldwide .
  • Chlorogenic acids (CGAs): These polyphenol antioxidants may benefit some biological pathways, such as blood sugar metabolism and high blood pressure, both of which are related to the risk of age-related mental decline .
  • Cafestol and kahweol: Present in coffee’s natural oil, high amounts of these compounds are found in unfiltered coffee. They may be good for the liver and protect against cancer, but a high intake may raise LDL cholesterol .
  • Trigonelline: This alkaloid compound is unstable at high heat and during roasting forms nicotinic acid, also known as niacin (vitamin B3). Trigonelline may also help prevent dental cavities by inhibiting bacterial growth.

However, the amounts of these substances in a cup of coffee may vary.

They depend on a number of factors, including the type of coffee beans, how the beans are roasted and how much you drink.

How Caffeine Can Boost Brain Function

Studies have shown that caffeine can boost brain function in the short term.

This is largely because it blocks adenosine from binding to its receptors.

But caffeine also stimulates the central nervous system by promoting the release of other neurotransmitters, including noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin.

Caffeine may improve various aspects of brain function, including :

  • Mood.
  • Reaction time.
  • Vigilance.
  • Attention.
  • Learning.
  • General mental function.

That being said, you may develop a tolerance to caffeine over time. This means you will need to consume more coffee than before to get the same effects.

Coffee Is

Research is showing benefits for everything from depression to liver disease. Is it just the caffeine?

Remember when people (and their doctors) used to worry that coffee would harm their hearts, give them ulcers, and make them overly nervous?

In excess, coffee, and more particularly, caffeine, can cause problems. But the fretting about two or three cups a day, or even more, is fading as study results suggestive of health benefits from coffee keep on coming in. In 2011, researchers reported findings that coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of depression among women, a lower risk of lethal prostate cancer among men, and a lower risk of stroke among men and women. Go back a little further, and you’ll come across reports of possible (it’s not a done deal) protective effects against everything from Parkinson’s disease to diabetes to some types of cancer (see sidebar below).

Caffeine has been studied more than any other ingredient in coffee, and it tends to get credit if the body part benefited is the brain. But coffee contains literally a thousand different substances, and some of the lesser lights are thought to be responsible for healthful effects in other parts of the body. Some studies show caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee as having the same effect, which suggests that something else in coffee is involved.

It gets complicated, though. Caffeine and some of these other substances in coffee seem to have their good and bad sides, and coffee’s overall effect may depend on how much they cancel each other out.